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what did i learn today
For me, it started with a tweet from Uncle Bob Martin, saying that if all your domain logic is in your model, or if you put your domain logic inside your models by default, then you are doing it wrong. I think the reasoning behind this is that we should design the domain model before relying on our database model (which is actually an implementation of that domain model). Because the best way to store something in the database is not always to best way to treat or represent or handle the data. In my Rails projects, I have to admit that in most cases the database is my domain model. Which in simple cases is correct, but in more complex cases it is not anymore. Secondly what happens is that your database model could shine through in your UI, or if it does not, your views or helpers could get very heavy. One good way to handle this is to use Presenters. Which goes into the direction of that domain logic, independent of the database. A Presenter is a class that groups all data, knows where to find it, or store it, and will match one-on-one on your presentation/view logic. Thirdly, I went to arrrrcamp, and there was Corey Haines doing his talk about Fast Rails Tests. While this title was very promising, Corey warned us that, in his own words, we would be underwhelmed. This was not entirely true, but not entirely false either :) In short what Corey said was: testing in Rails is slow because we need to drag around the framework, so why not cut out the framework where possible. So he showed an example where he extracted code from models and into separate modules, where you test them standalone. Standalone means: without requiring @spec_helper@. I did this for our modules inside @lib@ where possible, and truth be told: those specs now really fly! Awesome. But the large parts of our test-suite is our models, controllers, views, helpers where this is not possible nor wanted. I want to be able to run our complete test-suite faster, and this was not a solution for that. We scraped a few seconds of our complete time. Extracting code from our models into standalone modules will not make our total test-suite go faster either. Still it is something well worth investigating further. I don't believe in splitting up classes into modules just for the sake of making my tests faster. There has to be some logical reason (pertaining to the domain model --that is). But maybe presenters could be the way out here:
  • they group domain logic
  • while they are responsible for retrieving the correct objects from the database, these actions are just delegated to the responsible models
So that sounds promising to me and a road I will investigate.
Arrrrcamp 29/10/2010
The fourth and most international of all arrrrcamp editions. Also the first paying edition. As i said in my post about the previous edition, i have been to all editions, and it is awesome to see how it has grown. The schedule was amazing, with an amazing array of international speakers, of which for me especially Yehuda Katz i looked forward to. The biggest problem i had was that two of my collegues gave a talk at the same time, both of which i wanted to see. Choices choices choices :) Let me give a quick impression of the talks i did see:

Keynote by Carl Lerche:

To be frank, i had totally no idea who Carl was. But his talk was very nice, talking about the speed improvements Rails does, under the covers, unknown at least to me, to get your site visible as soon as possible. Also the speed improvements they will take in the next version 3.1 and 3.2 to improve this even further. In short, they look for ways to serve the HTML so that a browser can download the page and all the assets quicker. Very new to me, touched some very interesting subjects as automatic spriting, the cache manifest ... But in the end, there is one thing that Rails can't solve: latency. That is the core time it takes to reach a server and get back to the client. A mere ping. If you want to reduce latency, you either make sure your servers are really close to all clients, ... or ... you work in a different way, and let your client handle more stuff. In short: using a minimal HTML which is only downloaded once, using the cache manifest and lots of javascript: back to client side code? Hold that thought, we'll come back to that later.

Escaping the Sludgy Swamp of Slow Tests by Joseph Wilk

This is a problem we are getting into at work. We try to solve that by running our tests in parallel. Joseph explains the routes they had taken in their team.
  • First off: use a lot of EC2 instances to reduce time. They went from 4hours build time to 11minutes, cheering developers, but very angry boss :) EC2 is not cheap!
  • So then they introduced some kind of low-level caching, which will cache sequences of SQL commands and returned a cached result. This sounds very interesting as that is what you see most in tests: a lot of similar db-setup to actually test something small.
  • Thirdly a great idea was to divide your tests into different sets, and only run those that are most likely to fail. Those that always succeed you only run nightly, and the ones that sometimes fail you also seperate so you can more easily test those, check loggings, and hopefully fix them.
I also remembered the suggestions to use capybara together with env.js to be able to test your javascript pages quicker. Good tips, and i especially like the graphics (and humour) on the slides :D

Refactoring++ : Refactor Everything A.T.F.T by Alain Ravet

A talk by a collegue of mine (had to miss Elise's talk, bummmmer, but her talk is recorded so i hope to see that later). I know most of his refactoring tips, because we have paired extensively and i have learned a lot by doing that. Alain took a small piece of code from the internet, an example to solve the Towers of Hanoi: the code was small and compact and seemed to be ok. But then Alain was able to find and show a lot of improvements. That was great. Aside from the standard refactorings (from the book) Alain also stressed the scanability of the code. This is also a pet-pieve of mine. Code has to be formatted nicely and correctly. In teams it is preferred that classes follow a bit the same structure, e.g. inside rails it is easy to make agreements where to expect the filters, constructors, public methods, ... Also Alain stressed the point to know your tools and your language. Ruby is a very expressive and compact language: use that to your benefit! Know the tool you are using, whether it is Rubymine, Textmate or VIM. And practice. Do code kata's, download some code and refactor-refactor-refactor.

Making it an Anti-Pattern is Not Enough by Timothy Payton and Sebastian Roebke :

I saw these guys last time, and i was very impressed by them at that time. Probably because what they said struck a chord, and matched my own experiences. This time, i found them less persuasive. I think maybe because my expectations were too high, they re-iterated a lot they said last time (or so it felt), the title was not explained anywhere (or i missed that), and i guess they were also having troubles with the single microphone (being two speakers) that made them more uncomfortable. Still a very nice talk, and Xing seems to be a very nice place to work.

Lightning Talks

  • Friendly attributes: apparently, in mysql, adding a columns is a very expensive operation. So this guy looked for alternatives, and came up with friendly attributes. This could be a very nice tool for someone if you are forced to use MySql (e.g. by your hosting provider). Otherwise i would suggest to use Postgresql.
  • A postgres textsearch without any extra server: this seemed very interesting and promising, but also very non-existant at the moment. He was in the process of turning it into a gem. Wait and see.
  • Yehuda's 10 minutes about concurrency in MRI: inspired by Elise's talk about concurrency, Yehuda dug a bit deeper into MRI threads and possible advantages. Unfortunately none of the big servers (passenger or unicorn) make any use of that. Only thin --threaded would profit from that. This really was a lightning talk! A lot of information in a short span, very interesting!
  • @Defv's recipe for a good rails rumble: after his third Rails Rumble Jan gave us the recipe: 1) a knock-out idea but simple enough so any visitor/judge would get it, simple enough to implement in 48 hours, and 2) good design. With the next emphasis being: simple! simple! simple! Reminds me a bit of what 37signals always says.
  • Wicegrid: i have used this grid in a few big projects i did, and really liked it. Nice that Yuri showed it, hope some more people start using it.
  • Restart of BRUG: this was nice news too. I have seen that amsterdam.rb and rotterdam.rb exist, and was wondering why we don't have such a "working" thing in Belgium. But the guys from Openminds offered to revive it, they will support the first three sessions, and then other sponsors would need take over (volunteers from the public immediately jumped in). Meetings would take place in different cities, so i am very curious how this would work out. That would be very nice ;)

Closing Keynote by Yehuda Katz:

Yehuda recently switched jobs, and together with Carl Lerche they are now both actively working on a framework called Sproutcore. In short, Sproutcore (or SC) is a javascript MVC framework. So, MVC on the client. In the talk from Carl we learned that the big problem is latency, so one way to improve or remove that, is instead of developing your web-application in the Rails way, is to use a more client-centric way. Yehuda then showed us a few moving parts of Sproutcore, which he intends to extract in seperate libraries so you could use them more easily. They also stressed that Carl and Yehuda are aiming for a very tight integration with Rails in the future. Altough it is not entirely sure what or how that will be be. You would be using Rails to just serve json-data. Rails still has its very strong points to be used in the backend for something like that. His talk left me a bit baffled, to be honest. The big advantage for me of the Rails framework is that there is one language, one platform to develop in, to cover both server and client side. That is a big advantage. It is also a big advantage compared to using AIR or Silverlight on the client, because you remove the duplication of all the models on both sides (in Rails you only need them on server side). That said, i do believe the future lies in heavier clients, like gmail and twitter shows us. The bindings that Yehuda showed, reminded my very much of the bindings offered in WPF and Silverlight. Possible advantages of Silverlight: with Ironruby you have the option to run ruby in the client as well. But, as the video-section of arrrrcamp themselves show: Silverlight it is not ready for all platforms. It does not work on my ubuntu 10.10. I am thinking now would be a good time to revive the idea of a ruby vm on javascript. In no specific order:
  • Hotruby was very promising but seems dead. With the speed improvements in current javascript vm's it would seem awesome to get some ruby on javascript too.
  • rubyjs: compiles ruby to javascript to be run in the browser
  • Js.class could be an alternative approach: use the classes and paradigms of ruby in javascript.
  • red: writes like ruby and runs like javascript
  • coffeescript: not quite ruby, that compiles into javascript
I will dig into these alternatives in a later post :) The biggest advantage of sproutcore over extjs, AIR or Silverlight is that sproutcore is truly open source. Exciting times ahead :)

To conclude

As usual I really enjoyed arrrrcamp, the organisation was great, i enjoyed seeing and talking to a lot like-minded people, and the talks were really though-provoking this year. Setting sail to the next edition!
Arrrrcamp
Went to arrrrcamp last friday (Arrrr as in Ruby, Rails, Radiant and, of course, Rhum!). It was the third edition of this unique ruby-on-rails event, and the third time i visited it ;) So i am a regular :) The first year i was just starting ruby and my then-collegue and me learned a lot. The second time i took some new collegues along hoping to get them infected with the ruby virus. This year i went alone (so you can guess how well the infection spread :), but one advantage of being alone in a croud is that it is way easier to mingle. There's even a picture to prove it :) I saw some very interesting talks:
  • Something Something Mongo: I alrready had read about Mongo, and was interested. This speech interested me more than Radiant. Just another NoSQL database. Some things were not entirely clear, like how you can query stuff if all things are in the same "database". But it seems like something i should investigate more. I think there are a lot of possible applications, and the presenter showed a very good example, where the database is entirely configurable by the end-user, which is dead-easy in Mongo and MongoMapper, because there is no schema! Ha! :) Opens up possibilities indeed ;)
  • jQuery on Rails: at the same time there was a talk about the new things in Rails3. So this was a hard choice. But i am already using jQuery, in combination with Prototype, and was hoping to get some tips to do it better. The talk was very quick, but also very informative. The presenter did a very cool job, where he showed the same site in Prototype (using helpers) and jQuery (using unobtrusive javascript). Very nice. I still write most of my javascript inline, and am gradually switching over. I am still struggling with one problem. In most of unobtrusive javascript examples, i always see that all code is placed in the application.js. But that is not good enough for me. I want a js file per erb-file. I found a blogpost by Yehuda Katz, where he does something even smarter: only include the js-files which include the selectors from the current page. But unfortunately it is so old, the source is nowhere to be found anymore. when i asked the presenter, after the session, he pointed me to this article about Jzip, but on second look it is not quite what i am looking for.
  • Railties: what, why & how?: a very interesting talk, but i must admit, since Rails 3 territory is still very unknown to me (and a lot has changed apparently) a lot of it was unclear. In short: the old way to create rails plugins is replaced by Railties. Plugins and engines are supported, dependencies are more explicit. Something i still need to look into, to convert the plugin we use at work.
  • Something something Rack: actually i did not want to see this one, but rather the 12 hours to rate a rails website by Elise Huard, but because @Atog was late those two talks had switched. She confided, however, that i would get a second change at RailsConf :) The something-something-rack talk was very basic, but also enlightning. Rack provides a minimal interface between webservers supporting Ruby and Ruby frameworks. Rack applications can be stacked. Since Rails is a Rack application, it is now very easy to put Rack-apps in front of Rails, for instance to redirect to different sites or pages if the visitor uses a mobile device (Rack::MobileDetect), add google analytics to your pages automatically (Rack::GoogleAnalytics), or to block unallowed access (Rack::Warden). Very interesting. Also allows for a clean seperation of concerns. One last Rack middleware I really want to mention: Rack::ChromeFrame! This middleware will make sure the Google Chrome frame is automatically enabled. Cool :)
  • Learning to smile at your code: a talk by two german guys, who both work at Xing, about refactoring and to learn to actually enjoy it. Xing is a very big website, coded for the largest part in Rails. They have 22 developers working in Rails. Sebastian and Tim, the presenters, had to add features to the job-postings page/code and encountered a lot of problems doing so. I really liked this talk because i found it very recognisable and also because it was a talk focusing on the programming of an application as a whole. They used a lot of humour to convey their message, with success. Really-really compressed their message was: 1) seeing a lot of old, incomprehensible code can be demotivating; 2) breathe and relax; 3) starting to refactor it anyway, despite the obvious unwillingness at first, will make you smile because you can create something beautiful. They gave some examples which i guess barely even scratched the surface of the complexity they had to deal with. Nice :)
After that the lightning talks came (short talks of about 10 minutes). I will highlight a few:
  • failtale: a notification framework/website by the guys from Mr. Henry. Impressive, because not only does it capture ruby/rails exceptions, but also ActionScript (flash) and Javascript soon. I am going to try that out! :) I am currently using Exception Notifier myself, curious how it compares.
  • The guys from 10-forward did three talks. First a demo of their application, which was incredibly impressive. Wow! Blew me away. A lot of javascript and ajax to make the website feel like a real application. Very powerful. Then they discussed a gem of theirs, and rspec and cucumber.
  • wallsome: Sebastian and Tim from Xing, who also did the Learning to smile talk, here presented their pet-project, using Rails 3 and jQuery: a wall to arrange your tasks from Basecamp like in Scrum or Kanban.
I am looking forward to the next edition on the 29th of october! :)